Security

Protect your accounts

The security of your account information is our top priority. Learn what we're doing and what you can do to help protect yourself from fraud, identity theft, and phishing.

How Alaska USA protects your information

Think you're being targeted?

Forward suspicious emails or text messages to phishing@alaskausa.org

 

Alaska USA Federal Credit Union has implemented a full range of security measures to ensure the safety of your information including encryption, authentication, firewalls, secured backend systems, fraud-monitoring tools, and session management controls. 

To further protect your account information exchanged between your computer and the credit union is encrypted using Verisign's Global Secure Site ID.

Alaska USA will never contact you to ask for login or payment information such as your email or online banking passwords or your debit card number, PIN, or CVV.

Scammers may contact you via phone calls, text messages, or email, and may claim to represent Alaska USA or another organization you trust. They may to try to trick you into sharing sensitive information, installing dangerous software, or visiting fraudulent websites. However, when you call Alaska USA, we will ask questions to verify your identity.

Steps you can take to protect your account

There are several steps you can take to ensure the security of your account:

  • Use a current web browser, and keep your computer anti-virus, and browser up-to-date.
  • Be skeptical of any unexpected email message or text message. Phishing messages often encourage urgent action. 
  • Change your online account access password periodically and don’t share it with anyone. Don't use the same password on any other website.
  • Create complex passwords using a mixture of letters, numbers, and characters. Avoid easily guessed words or using personal information such as your phone number, pet, or family names.
  • Don't share your passwords or Personal Identification Numbers (PINs), and never write them down or leave them in plain view.

What to do if you’re a victim

  • Contact all financial institutions where you have accounts and request that your accounts be notated that you are the victim of identity theft.
  • File a report with your local law enforcement as well as the Federal Trade Commission reporting the theft.
  • Visit IdentityTheft.gov, the federal government’s one-stop resource for victims of identity theft.

Place a credit freeze

A credit freeze will totally “lock” your credit – no one will be able to access your credit file without you unfreezing the file first. To place a credit freeze, contact each of the nationwide credit reporting agencies:

After receiving your freeze request, each credit reporting company will send you a confirmation letter containing a unique PIN or password. Keep the PIN or password in a safe place. You will need it if you choose to lift the freeze.

Fraud alerts

A fraud alert will allow institutions to pull your credit, but they will receive a notice requiring that they call you to verify before proceeding. To place a fraud alert contact Equifax, Experian, or TransUnion. A fraud alert is free to place but only remains on your file for 90 days. After 90 days, you can call and renew the alert.

Phishing and identity theft

Protect your confidential information by not responding to fraudulent emails or texts.

Phishing is a specific type of fraud that uses email and text messages to direct you to a fraudulent website to enter your confidential information which can be used to compromise your accounts or steal your identity.

  • Look for misspelled words and other grammatical errors, although this clue is less common as scammers become more sophisticated.
  • Take a name or some text from the message and put it into a search engine to see if any known phishing attacks exist using the same methods.
  • Mouseover the link to see if it's a legitimate link or navigate to the provided link manually by entering the legitimate website address into your browser.
  • Before you log in to any secure site, check to make sure the Lock or Key icon is displayed in your browser. These symbols indicate that the page you are using will protect and keep confidential any data sent from your computer.

Sometimes the return address on Phishing messages are “spoofed,” or made to appear as an address different than the sender’s actual address. Never rely on the return address to identify the sender, even if it seems like the message came from a trusted source. Remember, Alaska USA will never call or email you to ask for account information.

Most email and messaging programs have spam filters that will help keep harmful or dangerous emails out of your inbox. However, if you suspect that a message is a potential Phishing scam, here are some tips:

  • Visit www.annualcreditreport.com or call 877-322-8228 to order your free credit report annually.
  • Never click on the links contained in the message, or open any attachments.
  • Password protect your mobile devices and add your phone numbers to the Do Not Call Registry.
  • If you aren’t sure if a message can be trusted, open a new browser window and type the address in yourself, or contact the business by phone.

Most importantly, don't click that link! If you do not respond to a phishing email or text messages, you won't compromise your confidential information. 

Instead, report any suspicious messages to the following:

Note: Forwarding a text to this number is only available with AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile, Sprint, and Bell Canada cell providers.

Additional steps to protect yourself:

  • Never click on a link or attachment in a message from an unverified source.
  • Be skeptical of any unexpected email message that encourages you to take quick action. 
  • Use a current web browser, and keep your computer, browser, and anti-virus software up-to-date.
  • If you receive a phishing message, file a complaint at www.ic3.gov.

If you responded to a fraudulent message or provided any information and later identify it to be a Phishing scam, call the Member Service Center at 800-525-9094 right away to speak with a member service representative about the kind of information may have been compromised.

Remember: Alaska USA will never contact you to ask for login or payment information such as your email or online banking passwords or your debit card number, PIN, or CVV. Scammers may contact you via phone calls, text messages, or email, and may claim to represent Alaska USA or another organization you trust. They may to try to trick you into sharing sensitive information, installing dangerous software, or visiting fraudulent websites. However, when you call Alaska USA, we will ask questions to verify your identity.